Emergency

The following information has been provided by the Nagoya International Center

Earthquake Preparedness

Earthquake Survival Kit After a major earthquake, it may take 2 to 3 days for food and emergency supplies to be distributed, so prior planning on your part could make a major difference in your level of comfort in the aftermath. So, exactly what should you include in your emergency supplies?

• First aid kit and essential medications.
• 3 days supply of canned food and can opener; rotate water and food in your kit to ensure freshness.
• 3 – 4 days supply (at least 10 liters) of water per person.
• Protective clothing, rainwear, and bedding or sleeping bags.
• Change of clothing.
• Battery-powered radio, flashlight, and extra batteries.
• Special items for infant, elderly, or disabled family members.
• Written instructions for how to turn off gas, electricity, and water if authorities advise you to do so.
• Keeping essentials, such as a flashlight and sturdy shoes, by your bedside.
• Passport, 30,000 Yen in cash.
• Other items: Newspapers, plastic wrap, rubber gloves, garbage bags, tape, paper cups, plates and utensils all proved to be very useful in the aftermath of the 1995 Kobe earthquake.


Emergency Evacuation Areas (Hinanjo 避難所) If during a flood or earthquake your residence becomes un-livable, you feel you are in danger, or an evacuation order has been given, then temporary accommodation and assistance can be obtained at your nearest emergency evacuation center, usually a designated elementary school or park. Emergency Evacuation Center location maps for each ward are available from ward offices or from the Nagoya International Center 3F Information Counter. Alternatively, they can be downloaded at from the Nagoya City website. Plan ahead and locate the nearest one to your home and your place of work or study.

- Nagoya City Evacuation Shelters and Safe areas – By ward in a handy, printer-friendly PDF format


Prepare Your Home Most initial deaths and injuries caused by earthquakes are a result of falling objects or flying glass. In the 1995 Kobe Earthquake there were over 6,000 fatalities and over 40,000 injuries. The earthquake occurred at 5:46 in the morning, most victims were still in bed when the tremor struck. It makes common sense to prepare your home for such an event.

1. Install strong latches on cupboards and sliding doors.
2. Move or secure objects that could block your exit route.
3. Remove or isolate flammable materials.
4. Use glass safety film on the interior of all windows.
5. Make sure you know the location of emergency exits, fire alarms and fire extinguishers. Always keep a fire extinguisher in your home.
6. Don’t place your bed near a window or hang heavy objects such as mirrors or paintings in a position where they could fall on the bed.
7. Choose a safe place in every room–under a sturdy table or desk or against an inside wall where nothing can fall on you.
8. Do not place combustibles near stoves, etc.
9. Prepare fire extinguishers or buckets of water, in case a fire should break out.
10. Move or secure objects that could fall on you such as books, picture frames, wall clocks, or anything hanging. Heavy objects such as bookcases or top-heavy furniture should be secured.


Emergency Message System – NTT 171

To cope with communications difficulties in the event of an earthquake, authorities have designed a message bank in which you can leave and access messages to record information about yourself and confirm the safety of others. Unfortunately this cannot be accessed from overseas and it is most likely that you will not be able to use your cell phone to access this service in the event of an earthquake. At this stage the service can only be accessed by fixed phones, such as public or residential.

How to use the system: To leave a message: – Dial 171
- Press 1 then # (pound)
- Input your own number starting with the area code
- Record your message (max 30 seconds)
- Press 9 and # then hang-up.
- For example 171+1+(052) XXX-XXXX To listen to a message – Dial 171
- Press 2 and then dial the number starting with the area code of the person you are trying to contact.
If they have left a message you will be able to access it. Messages are saved for 48 hours.
For example 171+2+ (052) XXX-XXXX Medical Interpretation Services Pilot Program Many foreign residents who cannot speak Japanese experience difficulty when visiting a medical institution; even if they take a friend who can speak Japanese with them, their friends inability to understand and convey technical terms can hamper communication.

Weather Information in English

If your TV is equipped to receive dual-language broadcasts, NHK news at 7 pm includes detailed weather information. As well as weather warnings and advisories the JMA’s English-language website provides up-to-the-minute information on typhoons and other weather-related topics. www.jma.go.jp/en/warn/ Weather Warnings Weather warnings and weather advisories are issued by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) in the below categories:

• Heavy rain 大雨 ōame
• Flood 洪水kōzui
• Storms暴風bōfū and Gales強風 kyōfū
• High waves 波浪 harō
• Storm surges 高潮 takashio
• Thunderstorms 雷 kaminari
• Dense fog 濃霧 nōmu • ”Chuihō” 注意報 advisories are issued when there is a risk of natural disaster. They are usually abbreviated as注and usually shown in yellow on weather maps. • ”Keihō” 警報 warnings are issued when there is a severe threat from a natural disaster. They are usually abbreviated as 警and usually shown in red on weather maps.

For example a “Heavy Rain and Flood Warning” would be an ōame・kōzui keihō 大雨・洪水 警報 Emergency Evacuation Areas (Hinanjo 避難所) If during a flood or earthquake your residence becomes un-livable, you feel you are in danger, or an evacuation order has been given, then temporary accommodation and assistance can be obtained at your nearest emergency evacuation center, usually a designated elementary school or park. Emergency Evacuation Center location maps for each ward are available from ward offices or from the Nagoya International Center 3F Information Counter. Plan ahead and locate the nearest one to your home and your place of work or study.